Scholars in Press: An interview with Elizabeth Robar

Scholars in Press: An interview with Elizabeth Robar

Name: Elizabeth Robar Education: MA in OT & MA in NT from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary; Graduate work with Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics; ABD from Southern Seminary (changed programmes from LXX > Hebrew, hence Southern > Cambridge); PhD from University of Cambridge Favorite Past-time: Sip homemade hot chocolate while my husband reads aloud to the family; … Continue reading

Scholars in Press: An interview with Mike Aubrey

Scholars in Press: An interview with Mike Aubrey

Name: Mike Aubrey Education: I received a BA in Biblical Languages at Moody Bible Institute in 2007. Since then, my wife and I have been actively preparing for service with SIL/Wycliffe Bible Translators as a linguist. We completed certificates in applied linguistics in 2008 as well as started graduate studies in linguistics at the Graduate Institute … Continue reading

The (supposed) infallibility of the printed word

The (supposed) infallibility of the printed word

If it’s in print it must be inspired. When I first began my studies in biblical languages I always marveled at my professor’s ability (read: audacity) to challenge a lexicon’s gloss or push back on a translation’s rendering. What gave him this authority? [Looking back, this incredulity must have been what the religious elite of Jesus’ day … Continue reading

Greek Linguistic Historiography, O my!

Greek Linguistic Historiography, O my!

Here at Old School Script we typically don’t re-post stuff here. For the most part this is a place for original contributions. With that said, when we do: you should pay attention. Over at Koine Greek—one of the few other linguistically oriented bible related blogs—Mike Aubrey has an ongoing project aimed at exploring old school … Continue reading

Identifying the topical and focal relations in James 3:6 (or, “and THE TONGUE is a fire” versus “and the tongue IS A FIRE”)

Identifying the topical and focal relations in James 3:6 (or, “and THE TONGUE is a fire” versus “and the tongue IS A FIRE”)

posted by Kris (w/a “k”) 5b Ἰδοὺ ἡλίκον πῦρ ἡλίκην ὕλην ἀνάπτει· Behold how small a fire sets ablaze how great a forest! 6 καὶ ἡ γλῶσσα πῦρ And the tongue is a fire! The unmarked word order of a verbless clause is for the subject to precede the predicate, as is the case here. Natural salience is assigned … Continue reading

Moral and Ritual Purity: A True Divide?

Moral and Ritual Purity: A True Divide?

Posted by Kris (w/a “k”) The other day a new book came in. One I’ve been waiting for. I’m just getting into it but here’s an excerpt on the supposed dichotomy of ritual and moral purity: “Let us finally touch upon one important aspect of the purity discussion that is of particular relevance for the … Continue reading

Grammaticalization explained in common tongue, in 1891

Grammaticalization explained in common tongue, in 1891

posted by Kris (with a “k”) The other day I was looking at Hopper and Traugott’s (2003) Grammaticalization and came across this creative analogy of how a form may undergo grammaticalization. It’s such a fun example, so if you’re new to this concept, read on. If this is old news, read on—it’s good. While the first paragraph … Continue reading

Is writing valued more than reading?

Is writing valued more than reading?

posted by Kris (with a “k”) Cambridge Extra (a blog affiliate of CUP Linguistics) published a post the other day on a topic I hadn’t given much thought to: the rise of writing (and decline of reading). Here’s a couple quotes to give you a taste of the article, but it’s certainly worth its own read. … Continue reading